Posts tagged sweet potatoes

Ultimate Guide to Staying Healthy in the Colder Months by Herbal Papaya

Ultimate Guide to Staying Healthy in the Colder Months by Herbal Papaya

http://www.herbalpapaya.com

The colder months provide us with a certain nostalgia, of changing foliage and winter wonderland memories. Don’t let this cold season be tainted with feeling less than your best.

As the weather gets colder and more friends start getting the flu, it’s time to take a step back and look into what we should be doing for our own health this holiday season.

You may hear time and time again that your body is a temple and you should treat it as such, but have you taken the time to think about what that means for your busy lifestyle?

The following tips for staying healthy in the colder months may come as obvious to you, but really think about if you do in fact focus on these parts of your health every week. Sometimes we need a simple reminder in the form of a blog post to get us back on track and thinking about putting our health first.

You’ll notice that this guide to staying healthy is not just about nutrition, although that’s a big part of it. Health begins with a balance of wellness in both the mind and body.

If you’re eating nutritious food but constantly stressed about little things at work, you will not reach your full healthy potential. Likewise, if you’re starting to exercise everyday but never getting enough sleep at night, you probably won’t feel at all energized or happy the next day.

Read through this list, take it in, and start to realize how interconnected every aspect of our mind and body are in terms of health. Try to hit each one of these goals for a month straight and see if you notice a difference in how you feel. It may seem like a lot of different aspects to focus on right now, but once you get into the habit, you will thank yourself later.

Hydration is Key

Hydration, hydration, hydration…hydration. The fact is, it’s hard for the average person to stay properly hydrated throughout the day, to reach that impossible 8 glasses of water.

The best advice I can give you is it’s all about making it a habit. When you wake up, have a glass of water with your morning coffee. Before you go to bed at night, drink a glass of water. Instead of reaching for that coke at lunchtime, you guessed it, reach for water instead.

Some people have a hard time enjoying the taste (or lack thereof) of water. If you’re one of those, opt for sparkling flavored water or hot tea.

Goal: Stay conscious of how much water your getting a day, and always try to one up yourself until you reach your personal goal of water intake.

Focus on a Nutritious Diet

The winter can be the hardest time to have a nutritious diet, there are so many indulgences around this time of the year it’s very easy to slip into bad habits.

Instead of the the warm comfort foods or canned overly-salted soups that are taunting you, try making your own soups and stews from home with fresh winter vegetables that have a high amount of vitamins and nutrients. Sweet potatoes, green leafy vegetables, and beetroot are all great winter vegetables to try in a soup.

It’s great if your diet also includes plenty of legumes, wholegrains, nuts and seeds, and uses a lot of herbs and spices to round it out.

Try to eliminate sugar as much as possible – I realize this is easier said than done with the giant more chocolate popping up in the grocery store these days.

Goal: Try to go a whole month with little to no sugar in your diet (before Christmas!) and make 2 new homemade soups with delicious winter vegetables.

Exercise Regularly

There’s no doubt about it, it’s hard to exercise regularly as it starts getting colder outside. Your body’s natural response is to curl up under mountains of blankets and watch Netflix marathons while sipping hot cocoa.

I get it, I really do, but you have to start thinking about your body too! If it’s more attractive, think of moving your exercise indoors where it’s warmer. At the gym, or at home with weights, or a yoga mat and your ability to do jumping jacks. Whatever will keep you moving, do that.

If you’re more of the runner type or still want to spend time moving around outdoors, make sure to spend extra time warming up your joints inside to avoid any unnecessary strains or discomforts.

Goal: Exercise 3x a week for 1-2 hours at a time. If you’re feeling adventurous, try out a few different types of exercise – both indoors and outdoors – to see what motivates you the most.

Reduce Stress

Stress takes everything happy out of your life and puts it into a pinhole perspective of negativity. And ironic enough, the most stressful time of the year is usually around the holidays.

A small amount of stress can be good and keep you motivated to do what you need to get done. For the most part; however, stress is a very, very bad thing to give into.

Some of us lead much more stressful lives than others, usually depending on our socioeconomic status or our careers. Regardless of your amount of stress in life, there are always ways to at least try to reduce it or combat it completely. A lot of those de-stressing tactics use the idea of mindfulness.

Taking a step back to survey your life and the root of your stress, can be incredibly successful in making you realize either how unimportant that stressful item is in the scheme of things, or how unhelpful stress is in working through the issue.

Goal: Take up a mindfulness hobby this month – whether that be yoga, meditation, or singing away your blues in the shower. Whatever works for your personality and gets you out of your stress bubble.

Get Enough Sleep

This is such an important tip to follow in life, and one that’s hard to adhere to sometimes in our busy lives. Sleep allows your body to recover and renew.

Similar to an iPhone that’s low on battery charge and stressing you out with the chance it could shutdown on you, your body can get overwhelmed mentally and physically a lot quicker with a lack of sleep.

Everybody is different in the amount of sleep you need, and it also depends on how active you are on a day-to-day basis. In general, it’s best to set aside 7-9 hours of sleep a night for your body to rest and feel good the next day.

Goal: For the next month, never dip below 7 hours of sleep. Download an app such as SleepCycle onto your phone, which records your sleep patterns and gives you insight on how your sleep could be better depending on your lifestyle.

Wash Your Hands

You may think this as a way too obvious recommendation, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve walked into a public bathroom stall, heard the stall door open next to me and footsteps echoing out the door without a squeeze of soap or a hint of water spilled from the faucet.

That my friends, is what I call gross. And more importantly, unsanitary. So many germs are spread from not washing our hands before cooking, after taking out the trash, and yes, even after using the bathroom.

Take that extra minute to let the tap warm up and use hot soapy water to wash your hands properly.

Goal: This should be a life goal – always wash you hands after using the bathroom. That goes for you too, guys!

Boost Immunity

Although a nutritious diet is one of the most important gifts you can give to your body, sometimes you need an extra little kick in immunity as well. We’ve talked a lot on this blog about how you can boost immunity and why it’s important to do so.

Immunity makes your body strong to fight against those viruses and seasonal attacks that can be so nasty once they get inside your body.

However, there are a variety of ways you can go about boosting your immunity depending on your preference. Echinacea, garlic, vitamin C, and zinc are also great for supporting a healthy immune system, whether you decide to take supplements or find them in fresh foods.

It could also be the time to start thinking about getting that flu shot if you haven’t already yet.

Goal: Focus on boosting your immunity once a day through herbal tea, food that contains one of the immune boosting elements above, or through a daily supplement.

Stay in Contact With Loved Ones

Don’t you always feel a rush of contentment or happiness after a long catch-up on the phone with a friend/mom/dad/you name it that you really love?

How about when you get a surprise postcard in the mail from your daughter who’s living across the country right now? How about just making a house call to your grandma who lives down the street?

Again, with busier and busier lives in the modern age, we sometimes push these interactions to the side and justify it by saying we’ll see them at the holiday.

Not only is life short and we’ll never truly know how much time we have with our loved ones, but these interaction provide you with a type of social proof and acceptance that makes you feel part of a community. This is very important to our mental wellbeing as humans.

In other words, these connections make you feel loved and respected, they tend to make you have a positive outlook on life, and thus provide you with a healthy mindset. Plus, it never hurts to make other around you feel nice and fuzzy inside.

Goal: Send a few handmade notes in the mail this month to people you respect and love, just to say hi and let them know you’re thinking of them.

Surround Yourself with Natural Light

Did you know that on average about 4 to 6 percent of people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD? Up to 10 to 20 percent of people can have a mild version of it, and SAD is also four times more common in women than it is in men.

There are a few ways to combat this type of seasonal depression, but one of the best ways is through light therapy. You can do this by purchasing a light box and/or surrounding yourself in places that provide a lot of natural lighting.

I’m attracted to places with a lot of natural light because I know it makes me feel happy, whether that be in a new cafe or the apartment that I choose to lease. I’m not the minority in thinking this way either, natural light has proven to be effective it making people feel content, happy, productive, and even inspired creatively.

Unfortunately, with the colder months and the lessening sunshine, natural light isn’t always possible or easily accessible. When this happens, try out a light box and see if it makes a difference in your overall wellbeing this winter.

Goal: Find a new cafe to go to in the morning that has great natural light, and notice if it makes you feel overall more happy when you start your day there.

– – – – – – – –

As I’ve said before and I’ll say it again, our happiness and wellbeing our interlinked by a multitude of aspects in life pertaining to our health. I hope you’ll try out a few of these tips and notice a difference this holiday season in your energy levels and health.

As Andy Williams once said, “it’s the most wonderful time of the year”. Don’t let poor health spoil a time meant for appreciating your family, friends, and the little things in life that make us happy.

Comments (1) »

unWanted: the Western S.A.D. Diet by Frederic Patenaude

Check out the great deals below on products from Frederic. The special offers are subject to change at any time, so buy now for your holiday gift giving.

unWanted: the Western S.A.D. Diet by Frederic Patenaude

I changed the title, as the original was Wanted: the Western Diet and this seems more appropriate

I remember the first time I came across the word “SAD Diet” while reading a health book. I smiled when I discovered that it meant “Standard American Diet.” What a clever acronym, I thought!

Indeed, the American diet is a pretty “sad” story.

But as my thinking evolved, I realized that the SAD diet could be any modern diet that causes diseases of affluence.

If we think of the SAD diet as an American phenomenon, we might be tempted to think of another ethnic diet as infinitely better, for example, the Thai, Indian or Italian diet. Although, in their most traditional forms, these diets can be very healthy, we almost never encounter them as such anymore.

For example, I’ve never come across a Thai restaurant that served truly traditional Thai food as was common before 1950, which would have been very low in fat and simple.

Modern Thai, American, Indian, Chinese, Italian or French restaurants serve modern versions of their ethnic cuisine.

They all have one thing in common: they all serve WESTERN food.

Yes, even Asian food has been westernized and the qualification of “SAD” can apply to it.

Ok, so why does this matter?

It matters because Western diets come hand in hand with Western diseases.

A Western diet is not necessarily a diet of foods commonly found in America or Europe. It’s any diet that has any the following characteristics. The more items you can check on the list, the more “Westernized” the diet is.

Animal products (eggs, fish, meat, chicken, dairy, butter, etc.). Not used as condiments but rather as a centerpiece of the meal. In most traditional societies, including all the long-lived cultures of the world, animal products were scarce and used occasionally. A piece of meat that would feed one person for one meal in American would feed an entire family for a week in Asia countries.
Regular consumption of vegetable oils. Vegetable oils were scarce in the past and not used as much as they are today.

Regular consumption of processed flours and sugars. Processed sugars and flours were unknown in the past. Bread was coarse and tough to chew — not the fluffy thing we use for sandwiches today. White sugar did not exist.

Liquid calories. Includes alcohol, fruit juice, sodas, etc. In traditional diets, those just didn’t exist or were consumed sparingly.

Lots of sodium — Although Asian cuisine now contains a lot of sodium, it wasn’t always like that in the past. In general, very little salt is used in many traditional diets. In some cases, salt is unknown.
A Western diet is a RICH diet. It’s a diet full of foods that were previously considered delicacies in the past. It’s like eating cake every day instead of once a year on your birthday.

Examples of Rich Foods

Vegetable oil, mayonnaise, rich sauces, butter
Eggs
Full-fat dairy products
Meat
Wine, beer, spirits
Ice Cream
White bread, pastries, muffins, panini bread, croissants, etc.
Coconut cream/milk
Peanut butter
Cakes, chocolate

Traditional Diets, on the other hand, are based on foods of much lower caloric density, like sweet potatoes, rice, beans, vegetables, fruit, etc.

It’s pretty easy to tell when a population is eating a Western diet: you simply have to look at the diseases that are prevalent in that population, and you’ll know.

The following diseases are all caused by the Western diet:

Obesity
Cardiovascular disease
Hypertension
Type 2 and type 1 diabetes
Osteoporosis
Colorectal, prostate and breast cancers
Many auto-immune diseases
Alcoholism
Those diseases were impossible to find in populations that ate a very traditional and non-Western diet.

Cancer does occur in nature and even in some animals, so it’s not always caused by diet alone. But the rates of some cancers are so much higher in Western countries that we know that they are mostly caused by the Western diet and lifestyle.

Every Country Is Becoming Westernized

There was a time when we could compare different populations in the world and be stunned to find that some diseases that are so common in the West were impossible to find in other populations.

We’re now reaching a point where such comparisons are no longer possible or relevant because every country in the world is becoming westernized.

Okinawa once boasted the longest-lived populations in the world. Now 47% of Okinawan men aged 20-60 are considered overweight. Heart disease is rampant.

For thousands of years, the health worry in Asia was with infectious diseases, famine, and malnutrition. Now that prosperity has reached the Eastern shores, they can worry instead about heart attacks, strokes, and cancer.

According to Time magazine, “80% of global CVD-related deaths now occur in low and middle-income nations which covers most countries in Asia.”

Anytime you see diseases of affluence popping up, you can be sure that the population is eating a Western diet. The two go hand-in-hand.

A particularity of a Western diet is the combination of two elements:

High-fat diet (30%+) that uses vegetable oils and animal foods at most meals
Refined carbohydrates in the 30+% range of total calories
Some people design diets that remove carbohydrates from the diet, therefore creating a “Western Diet Lite” – full of animal products and fat but without starches and sugar. This leads to health improvements and lower body weight.

A true non-Western diet that leads to health is based on plant foods and makes a limited use of rich foods. Also, it’s a total lifestyle where you’re active and don’t take in more calories than you burn.

Here are some easy ways to de-westernize your diet and eliminate your risk of dying or suffering from the most common modern diseases.

Skip breakfast. Intermittent fasting works and most people can benefit from it. Most traditional cultures ate only two meals a day rather than three. Unless you’re very active and need the calories, you’re probably not truly hungry for breakfast anyway and could benefit from a few extra hours of fasting. Intermittent fasting has been shown to increase longevity and improve health in many ways.

Base your diet on a few simple starches, such as rice, beans, potatoes or sweet potatoes. Add in fresh vegetables and fruit. This is the “Starch Solution” of Dr. McDougall. Add seasonings to taste. For example, lunch can be a big quinoa salad with cooked chickpeas, raw tomatoes, raw cucumbers, some chopped up herbs and onion, and a few slices of avocados. Dinner can be bean tacos with corn tortillas, black beans (whole or pureed) topped with fresh or canned salsa and hot sauce! A winner every time. Use nuts, seeds and avocados according to your energy needs.

For faster healing and fat loss, try a raw or high-raw diet. Replace one or more cooked meal with a raw meal, but make sure you eat enough fruit to get the calories you need.

Eliminate oils from your diet or use them only on occasion and extremely sparingly.

If you stray off the diet, make it a rare occasion, like traditional societies did in the past. They would slaughter a pig for a big feast, but not eat meat every day of the year. Eat cake for your birthday if you’d like, but don’t make it an every day or even an every-week thing!

Don’t consume any liquid calories except on special occasion.

Don’t cook with salt and don’t eat processed foods. Watch out for restaurant food. If desired, add salt to the surface of food after cooking. That’s where you can taste it the most. Doing this will keep you well under the upper limits for sodium consumption.

Diet and nutrition can be confusing, and journalists love to confuse the public with big headlines and studies of dubious value. One week, coffee is thought to be healthy and the next week, we learn that it can raise cholesterol levels. The average person will think “why bother if they can’t make up their mind? I’ll just eat whatever I want.”

In reality, nutrition is simple.

Don’t eat a Western diet and you’ll avoid Western diseases of affluence.

Eat whole plant foods (starches or fruit) as the main source of your calories. Eat vegetables. Don’t eat rich foods except on special occasions. That’s it! Add a form of exercise that you like and can incorporate into your life.

Doing that alone will save you from 75% of the diseases most people end up dying from in our world and will add at least ten good years to your life!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. All Rights Reserved. Advice and recommendations given in this website or in personal consultation by phone, email, in-person, online coaching, or otherwise, is at the reader’s sole discretion and risk. You should see a qualified, licensed doctor before starting any skin care, nutritional, diet, stretching, and/or exercise program. Information presented here is not to be interpreted as an attempt to prescribe or practice medicine. These statements and information have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. No product offerings are intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. You should always consult with a competent, fully-informed medical professional or health practitioner when making decisions having to do with your health. You are advised to investigate and educate yourself about any health related actions and choices you make.
——————————————————————
The program ”One Year of Raw Foods” features complete menu planners for every day of the year, and more resources to make this diet work.

This program features exactly what to eat, day by day, based on seasonal ingredients (no mangoes in January!), and a complete shopping list to help with your errands.

Check it out here as it is a great offer with lots of free extras!
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4900803
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I want to let you know that Frederic’s book, “How to Eat Well for Under $100 a Month on a Plant-Based Diet” with the companion book is available now for $29.95 instead of the usual price of $47.

How to Eat Well for Under $100
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4900783

Coupon: MINDY100
$29.95 instead of $47

Other great deals on products offered by Frederic to my readers, are available for a limited time, so don’t delay:

Starter Kit
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=3923008
Coupon: MINDYGOLDISSTARTER for 25% off
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Healthy Salad Dressings is available for $7 instead of $19.95
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4847273
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
How to Heal and Prevent Dental Disasters
This program has been created by OraMedia and is the only
course I have discovered that tells you exactly how to avoid
dental problems for the rest of your life.

Normally, the program costs $47.
The price is $30 if you use coupon code: MINDYDENTAL

Take control of your dental health and avoid thousands of
dollars in unnecessary treatments by going to:

http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?af=1115741

Make sure to use coupon code: MINDYDENTAL

Leave a comment »

Nutrition to Balance Hormones That Affect Your Mood

Nutrition to Balance Hormones That Affect Your Mood
From Herbal Papaya Newsletter – http://www.herbalpapaya.com

Now that summer is on the way, you’re undoubtedly ready to get outside and start doing “summer things.” You’ve probably noticed that you’re feeling better and that your mood is a bit more buoyant.

That’s not just a coincidence; vitamin D deficiency has been linked solidly to being moody, and sunshine is the only natural source of vitamin D. Therefore, when you’re out getting plenty of it, it’s entirely possible that your mood improves, too!

You may be surprised how much a healthy diet contributes to balanced hormones and helps with your mood, but there’s plenty of solid research to back up the theory that you are what you eat.

B vitamins are also being studied for their link with unhappy mood. Specifically B12, and to a lesser degree B6 and folate, have been linked strongly to feeling sad. This is a particular concern for vegetarians and vegans because B12 is found almost exclusively in animal products. Supplementation is necessary for that part of the population.

Vitamin C has historically been known as the vitamin that boosts the immune system. However, people who are unhappy often report significant boosts in mood after taking vitamin C. The studies here are fairly new but are promising.

One particular group of nutrients called carotenoids are linked significantly to brain, prostate, heart, eye and mental health. Carotenoids are phytonutrients found in yellow, red and orange fruits and vegetables and are powerful antioxidants. Some, but not all, convert to vitamin A in the body. Others, such as lycopene, may not convert but are still extremely valuable for their ability to bond to free radicals and help keep you healthy.

For instance, the minerals zinc and magnesium are being closely studied in relation to brain health. Both seem to play significant, though largely mysterious, roles in assisting with mood chemical production and uptake in the brain. A notable percentage of people who suffer from mood swings are found to be deficient in one or both of these minerals.

The carotenoids lutein, beta-carotene and zeaxanthin were studied in a group of almost 1800 people age 20-85. People with the highest levels of circulating carotenoids were a whopping 37% less likely to suffer from mood swings than those who had low levels.

A Japanese study of men only showed that men with the highest levels of carotenoids were an astounding 67% less likely to suffer from mood issues than those with the lowest levels. The studies are piling up.

Carotenoids are found in high amounts in foods that are bright orange, yellow, red or green such as:

sweet potatoes
papayas
red peppers
mangos
green leafy veggies
carrots
squash
dried apricots
cantaloupe

Leave a comment »

%d bloggers like this: