Posts tagged heirloom tomatoes

Should We Avoid Hybridized Fruits and Vegetables by Frederic Patenaude

Check out all the great discount offers below on health products from Frederic Patenaude. Please do not delay, as the prices are subject to change at any time.

Should We Avoid Hybridized Fruits and Vegetables by Frederic Patenaude

I recently received the following question from a reader:

“How do I buy fruits and vegetables that are closest to the way our ancestors ate them? I don’t want to be eating these hybridized apples and giant unnatural strawberries, etc. How do I go back to finding original types of fruits before they were altered? How and what should I be shopping for? I trust my instincts, but my instincts tend to push me away from the extremely sweet, weird-tasting new fruits. What should I shop for and where should I be buying? I live in Illinois.”

This is an interesting question, and my answer may surprise you.

First, my follow-up question is: “Why would you want to eat foods close to the foods your ancestors ate?”

It’s probably because you’ve been told that those foods are somehow better, healthier, and more nutritious. They contained less sugar, more fiber, and perhaps more antiox idants.

You probably also have bought the common myth that hybridized foods are bad for health.

But let’s put things into perspective.

Our ancestors ate foods that they could find in their environment, and over the course of thousands upon thousands of generations, they altered these plants by selecting the ones that they preferred.

Our ancestors always preferred foods containing more calories (natural sugar), a manageable amount of fiber, and fewer natural toxins.
The plants we cultivate today are the most nutritious and digestible foods that humans ever had access to.

Trying to go back to wild foods entirely would not only be a mistake, but it would also be counterproductive. While it’s true that some wild plants are nutritious and offer some health benefits, designing a diet around wild plants would be extremely ill advised.

If you tried to live on wild fruits, such as the ones that chimpanzees live on, you would be come sick and eventually die. That’s because humans are not adapted to live on wild plants. We are genetically adapted to foods with more available calories, fewer tannins and fewer natural toxins.

Richard Wrangham, from Harvard University, writes:

“Evolutionary adaptation to cooking might likewise explain why humans seem less prepared to tolerate toxins than do other apes. In my experience of sampling many wild foods eaten by primates, items eaten by chimpanzees in the wild taste better than foods eaten by monkeys. Even so, some of the fruits, seeds, and leaves that chimpanzees select taste so foul that I can barely swallow them. The tastes are strong and rich, excellent indicators of the presence of non-nutritional compounds, many of which are likely to be toxic to humans—but presumably much less so to chimpanzees. Consider the plum-size fruit of Warburgia Ugandensis, a tree famous for its medicinal bark. Warburgia fruits contain a spicy compound reminiscent of a mustard oil. The hot taste renders even a single fruit impossibly unpleasant for humans to ingest. But chimpanzees can eat a pile of these fruits and then look eagerly for more. Many other fruits in the chimpanzee diet are almost equally unpleasant to the human palate. Astringency, the drying sensation produced by tannins and a few other compounds, is common in fruits eaten by chimpanzees.

(…) The shifts in food preference between chimpanzees and humans suggest that our species has a reduced physiological tolerance for foods high in toxins or tannins. Since cooking predictably destroys many toxins, we may have evolved a relatively sensitive palate.”

I’ve spent a lot of time in Costa Rica, and I’ve had the chance to look at what monkeys eat in the wild. The monkeys in Costa Rica are not like great apes, but fruit constitutes most of the diet of some of these monkeys.

What always puzzled me is that whenever I saw the fruits these monkeys ate, and by accident some of it was dropped on the ground, it always looked far from edible to me.

Whenever I tried to eat some of these fruits, I found them to be repulsive. I could not even swallow one bite.

Humans have always had very good reasons to domesticate plants. The wild versions of most domesticated plants are either inedible, low in caloric value, or toxic.

If you attempted to live on wild plants, you would not thrive for very long. Almost every advocate of a “wild diet” still gets most of their calories from domesticated plants (and often animal products).

In the case of strawberries that are the size of small children, it’s true that sometimes the tastes of the public have pushed industry to create even bigger and tastier versions of common fruits. You may prefer the taste of smaller or even wild strawberries, but there’s absolutely nothing indicating that there’s anything wrong, health-wise, with big strawberries, as long as they haven’t been sprayed with a lot of pesticides.

Similarly, there’s absolutely no reason to avoid modern varieties of apples.

The problem with industry is not hybridization. The problem is that the marketplace has forgotten about older varieties of some plants, like apples or tomatoes.

There are literally hundreds of varieties of apples and tomatoes, but only a few are available commercially. However, every single one of those varieties is still domesticated and “hybridized.” They’re just less desirable for commercial reasons, either because the fruits don’t keep as long, or some other rationale like this.

Lately, there’s been a resurgence of interest for Heirloom tomatoes. Those varieties of tomatoes taste a lot better, although sometimes look “weird.” They’re just older varieties of tomatoes but are certainly not anything like the wild versions. They are still domesticated plants.
Seeking to eat what our ancestors ate isn’t practical or beneficial.

First of all, most of the plants they ate no longer exist. Over the course of evolution, they’ve selected the plants that best suited their needs. The initial wild varieties of those plants may still exist somewhere in nature, but you’d be shocked at how inedible those are!

A few exceptions come to mind: wild berries are excellent. But that may be because people, throughout history, have always picked wild berries, and “selected” the best-tasting varieties.

If you want to be healthy and stay healthy, eat foods available at health food stores, farmers markets, and supermarkets. There’s nothing wrong with the organic produce sold in those places. If you have a garden, you could try planting Heirloom varieties of some vegetables, but don’t fool yourself into thinking that those foods have anything to do with what our ancestors ate, tens of thousands of years ago.
————————————————————————————————–
If you’d like to find out the exact method to reverse and prevent dental problems, make sure to get the new edition of the program “How to Heal and Prevent Dental Disasters.”

In it, you will discover:

What you can do for your teeth if you already have decay above or below the gumline, pain, bleeding or loose teeth…

Why the dental industry on purpose wants you to come back for more visits with new problems to “fix” every time.

What to do if you lose a filling, chip or lose a tooth, etc.
And much more. Go to:

http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4900800

There’s a lot new in this 2016 version. You can get it at more than 50% off. This offer may end at any time!

————————————————————————————————-
Here are the other great deals on health products from Frederic:

B12 the Energy Vitamin

If you feel constantly tired in spite of getting good sleep, you may want to look at raising your vitamin B12 levels.

B12’s role in energy production is well known, and insufficient B12 levels can lead to fatigue and mood changes.

If you’ve never tried B12 patches, you can order them here:

To order B12 patches, go to:
http://www.mcssl.com/app/?Clk=5509946

—————————————————————————————————–

For all the store products, go to:
http://www.mcssl.com/app/?af=1652160

——————————————————————————————————
The program ”One Year of Raw Foods” features complete menu planners for every day of the year, and more resources to make this diet work.

This program features exactly what to eat, day by day, based on seasonal ingredients (no mangoes in January!), and a complete shopping list to help with your errands.

Check it out here as it is a great offer with lots of free extras!
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4900803
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I want to let you know that Frederic’s book, “How to Eat Well for Under $100 a Month on a Plant-Based Diet” with the companion book is available now for $29.95 instead of the usual price of $47.

How to Eat Well for Under $100
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4900783

Coupon: MINDY100
$29.95 instead of $47

Other great deals on products offered by Frederic to my readers, are available for a limited time, so don’t delay:

Starter Kit
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=3923008
Coupon: MINDYGOLDISSTARTER for 25% off
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Healthy Salad Dressings is available for $7 instead of $19.95
http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4847273
——————————————————————————

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. All Rights Reserved. Advice and recommendations given in this website or in personal consultation by phone, email, in-person, online coaching, or otherwise, is at the reader’s sole discretion and risk. You should see a qualified, licensed doctor before starting any skin care, nutritional, diet, stretching, and/or exercise program. Information presented on this website is not to be interpreted as kind of attempt to prescribe or practice medicine. These statements and information have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. No product offerings are intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. You should always consult with a competent, fully-informed medical professional or health practitioner when making decisions having to do with your health. You are advised to investigate and educate yourself about any health related actions and choices you make.

Advertisements

Leave a comment »

The Definitive Reason Heirloom Tomatoes Are Just Plain Better

The Definitive Reason Heirloom Tomatoes Are Just Plain Better
by Julie R. Thomson – Huffington Post

Heirloom Tomatoes

Heirloom Tomatoes

We hate to be the ones to tell you this, but if you’ve never had an heirloom tomato then you’ve never tasted a real tomato. With tomato season just upon us — and dreams of yellow, red, pink and purple slices on our plates — we began to wonder what it was that made heirloom tomatoes so much better than the conventional ones you can buy at the grocery store any time of year. We know they don’t look the same. And we know they cost more. But why?

We turned to expert gardener John Coykendall at the most magical place on earth, Blackberry Farm in Walland, Tennessee, to fill us in on the heirloom-tomato hype. He was gracious enough to give us his time and to answer our questions — and he perfectly articulated what it is that makes heirloom tomatoes so great, using the best analogies we’ve ever heard.

Let us cut right to the chase: Why are heirlooms better than industrially-grown or hybrid tomatoes?
The answer is simple: The old ones tasted like a real tomato. What we’re growing today, I would hardly classify as a real tomato. I suppose they’re alive, but the resemblance stops there. We had it right 100 years ago.

One thing is, you get all the subtle differences in heirlooms [that you don’t get in the other tomatoes]. Your yellow heirloom tomatoes are milder. And your red heirlooms have a lot more acidic quality. Something interesting of note is that if you look at a canning recipe from the 1930s or 40s, you didn’t have to add anything to it; those tomatoes had a very high acid content. Today’s tomatoes, all the flavor and taste and everything else has been bred out of it. So, if you look at the latest Ball canning book they’ve upped the processing time and also recommend you put a couple of tablespoons of lemon juice [to account for that]. There’s a big big difference.

We had a lady visit the other day who asked, “What do I do if I want a nice fresh tomato in January? I said, “Go to the store, buy a can of Romas, dump them in your salad bowl and dress it with your salad dressing — it’ll taste 100 percent more like a tomato than what you buy at the store that time of year.” It’s true — that’s just the way it is. The season is short, but you relish that time that you do have them. They don’t last forever. I always tell the guests that really good tomatoes are they come but once and year so take it and be thankful. The rest of the time you’re going to have to settle on something else that’s in season.

I know you’ve eaten — probably by mistake — a winter tomato that has a plastic skin and a styrofoam interior. Yeah, those ones from South Florida, the green ones, the baseball team uses those for batting practice before they head north. You couldn’t put a dent in one if you tried.

What else is special about heirloom tomatoes, aside from taste and their unique characteristics?
They’re so beautiful. Some of them are solid yellow, some have pink modeling to them. There’s one called Mr. Stripey. All of those sliced up together aesthetically speaking make a statement on the plate. They speak for themselves. People always ask when I give a talk if I make notes. And I say I don’t have to. If I have beans in front of me on the table each one of them has their own story — and it’s the same with the heirloom tomatoes.

All this talk about heirlooms, can you tell us what qualifies a tomato as an heirloom?

The rule of thumb for any kind of heirloom in the seed world is that something has to be at least 50 years old to be an heirloom. Or it has to be associated with an area, a farm or specific family. I’m an heirloom, plus 21 years.

How did the bland tomatoes at the grocery store become so common place?

In the early days we had farming communities all around us. Even outside NYC, they had the infrastructure for local farming. But that’s gone today. The tomatoes they grew in South Florida then had that wonderful flavor, but it was meant to go from the vine right to your dinner table. Those tomatoes won’t ship — the skins are soft and they bruise. They would go to pieces in no time. Now, they make tomatoes to ship. Bred for mechanical harvest, shipping, shelf life, etc.

I’ll give you a perfect example of that: we had someone doing an internship with us and she brought some of those tomatoes in. She was going to have them for lunch, but we got busy and she forgot. The next day I made a display out of them with some corn shucks, just different decorations. And I left those there until the end of March. I took everything down and lo and behold those tomatoes were still sitting there. Looked liked something out of King Tuts tomb — all shriveled up, but it never did rot. A mummified tomato. [That’s what they sell at the grocery store.]

Is there a national seal of approval for heirlooms?

[In short, no.] The way of knowing is the taste test. Once you get home and taste it you know you got the real thing. I don’t think I’ve ever seen an heirloom tomato faked — it either is or it isn’t.

Leave a comment »

%d bloggers like this: