Posts tagged calcium

Magnesi-yum by Steph Jackson

Magnesi-yum by Steph Jackson
http://www.stephjackson.com

Magnesium

So essential for so many of our daily activities and yet somehow so lacking for so many people. I attribute it to a combination of poor digestion/absorption and what I call the beige-food diet, lacking in fresh greens. Today we will discuss why magnesium is so amazing for us, where to get it from whole raw vegan foods and what it sometimes looks like to not have enough of this wonder-mineral.

More than half of the magnesium in our bodies is in our bones, a quarter of it in our soft tissues and fluids and another quarter in our muscles. Magnesium is partly responsible for maintaining cells’ electrical charges and also enables our cells to reproduce. Magnesium is important in energy production and protein forming. Magnesium is responsible for proper muscle function and proper insulin function. Now that’s important! With the ability to alter our metabolism and make our muscles (including our hearts) work properly, magnesium is the second-most prevalent mineral in our bodies after potassium.

A University of Virginia study followed people with adequate levels of magnesium for a fifteen year period and found that they had a 31% lower chance of developing Metabolic Syndrome compared to the rest of the population studied. Insulin resistance also burns up magnesium in the body leading to quite the downward spiral. In a separate double-blind study supplementation with Magnesium was shown to improve markers for metabolic syndrome in individuals that were previously deficient.

Some foods that are highest in magnesium are spinach, kale, collard greens, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, almonds, dried figs and chocolate. The nuts and seeds can be soaked and sprouted to reduce the phytic acid, making the magnesium more absorbable but soaking chocolate doesn’t really work out. I try to remember that chocolate is high in magnesium but much of it is difficult for us to absorb. Of course I love green juice but green smoothies and soups can also be great ways to get some green power. Popeye obviously had the right idea, strong and smart too 🙂 Watch this video http://stephjackson.com/videos/ to learn more about how magnesium boosts the brain.

Magnesium deficiency can appear in the form of blood sugar dysregulation as we discussed above and also in poor memory, fatigue, dizziness, constipation, high blood pressure, anxiety, tremors, cramps, weakness and deficiencies of other minerals such as potassium and calcium. Magnesium can help with sleep and depression. There is a reason why the brand “natural calm” has that name. Magnesium can also be rubbed into the skin “transdermally” or, of course obtained from our favourite green foods.
See this recipe http://stephjackson.com/green-homous/ for a magnesium-rich dip.

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Why Sea Vegetables? by Brian Hetrich, Greenhouse Manager at Hippocrates Health Institute

From The Garden by Brian Hetrich, Greenhouse Manager at HHI – Hippocrates Health Institute http://www.hippocratesinst.org

Why Sea Vegetables?

Sea vegetables are more commonly known as seaweed. They grow in salt water oceans all over the world. There are thousands of different types of sea vegetables, which are classified into categories by color, known either as brown, red or green sea vegetables. Each is unique, having a distinct shape, taste and texture. A wide range of sea vegetables are enjoyed as foods. This includes Kelp, nori, dulse, wakame, arame, Irish moss, kombu, hiziki, and many more.

Sea vegetables are among the World’s healthiest foods because of their incredibly rich mineral content and other unique health benefits. Sea vegetables are exploding with nutrients, including: Vitamins A, B, C, D, E, and K. They are rich in minerals like iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, iodine, sodium, potassium, silica, germanium, and phosphorus to name just a few. Sea vegetables also contain Proteins, Fiber, Carotenes, Enzymes, Oxygen, Phytonutrients, and Phytohormones.

The use of sea vegetables for food is not a new concept. Archaeological evidence suggests that Japanese cultures have been consuming sea vegetables for thousands of years. In ancient Chinese cultures, sea vegetables were a noted delicacy, suitable especially for honored guests and royalty. In fact, most regions and countries located by waters, including Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Iceland, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands and coastal South American countries have been consuming sea vegetables since ancient times. And they taste great!

Most food produced for commercial distribution on factory farms are on a life support fertilizer usually consisting of just three nutrients: nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. The other 95 minerals needed for good human health such as iron, calcium, copper, zinc, and magnesium, are missing. Minerals are missing from our foods because of soil depletion. As a result, the ocean is now the most fertile area for plants to grow. Sea vegetables absorb these minerals and convert them into a living form that our bodies can recognize and utilize.

Only plants, including sea vegetables, can convert dead, inorganic mineral compounds into living, organic mineral compounds that can be assimilated by the human body. When you supply the body with all the necessary raw materials to reconstruct tissues and organs correctly, everything gets better. All your organs, tissues, cardiovascular system, neurological system, and immune system get stronger and function with greater efficacy. Every aspect of your physical, mental, and spiritual health will improve when you supply the body with an adequate supply of the correct nutrients and remove toxins from your environment. That includes brain function, energy levels, physical appearance, and vitality.

Dulse is a popular one at Hippocrates. It is a delicious purple sea vegetable harvested off the Atlantic coasts for the U.S., Canada, and British Isles. It is rich in trace minerals and as a condiment, gives a slightly salty flavor to your other foods. Two tablespoons gives you many times the US RDA of iodine, which is just one of the highly desirable rare minerals contained in dulse. Iodine is an essential component of the thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones regulate many important biochemical reactions, including protein synthesis and enzymatic activity, and are critical determinants of metabolic activity. They are also required for proper skeletal and central nervous system development in fetuses and infants. Sea vegetables are able to accumulate iodine many times more concentrated than sea water alone!

And people need it now more than ever. Sea vegetables protect the body from radiation exposure by attacking radiation and neutralizing it. Sea vegetables also protect the thyroid against the damaging effects of fluoride, and they boost your immune system. About two tablespoons a day is all that an adult needs, and one tablespoon a day for children.

While fresh is always best, sea vegetables are very tough for general use when fresh. They are typically eaten in small quantities finely chopped or powdered. Larger pieces are commercially distributed in dried form which should be soaked in warm water for 10-20 minutes until they are soft enough to slice – this also removes some of the excess salt. Discard the soak water because it has an extremely high salt content. The drained sea vegetable can then be dried in a dehydrator until it is crunchy.

Since sea vegetables detox, I also recommend drinking copious amounts of pure, filtered water – at least ½ ounce of pure, filtered water for every pound of body weight per day. A squeeze of a fresh lemon wedge will alkalize you and help you to absorb the water more efficiently.

I use kelp and dulse as a garnish on my salad or I use them in homemade salad dressing to give a salty flavor. I use nori sheets to make raw vegan “sushi” wraps. Or, in powder form, I sprinkle a little kelp or dulse powder on my salad or I use them in homemade salad dressing to give a salty taste to my meals. I eat a lot of sprouts, a land vegetable, as well, because sprouts are live foods.

Here are some specific health benefits attributed to sea vegetables:

Detoxifier
Helps remove radioactive particles and heavy metals from the body
Rejuvenate gastrointestinal health and aid digestion
Blood purifier
Relieves arthritis stiffness
Promotes adrenal, pituitary and thyroid health
Normalizes thyroid-related disorders like overweight and lymph system congestion
A demulcent that helps eliminate herpes outbreaks
A decongestant for excess mucous
Helps normalize blood pressure
Powerful skin healing
Helps reduce breast and uterine fibroids and adhesions
Normalize menopausal symptoms
Promotes soft, toned, wrinkle-free skin
Enhances glossy hair and prevents its loss
An excellent adrenal stimulant
Recovery from arthritis
Recovery from gout
Effective in combating the herpes virus
Valuable for increased intimacy
Boosts metabolism
Strengthens hair, skin and nails

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Cultures Without Dairy Are Healthier by Brian Clement PhD, LN

Cultures Without Dairy Are Healthier
By Brian Clement Ph.D., L.N. http://www.hippocratesinst.org

Though no one knows for certain, it has been theorized that goats were the first dairy animals ever domesticated, probably in present day Iraq and Iran, about 10,000 years ago. Around this same time the Aurochs, wild long-horned ancestors of modern cows, were also domesticated but their milk wouldn’t be consumed for another few thousand years, until some humans could mutate a gene giving them lactase persistence so they could digest milk from ruminants.1
Dairy industry proponents of milk consumption today like to make the argument that milk and its byproducts—butter and cheese—have been the central feature of human diets throughout recorded history, with references to ‘milk and honey’ showing up numerous times in the Old Testament of the Bible.

While that may be true, at least in terms of Biblical references, this explanation conveniently leaves out one essential clarifying point—milk drinking only came about because of that genetic accident of human evolution and this accident only affected a small minority of Earth’s inhabitants about 6,000 or so years ago.

“It was only because of a genetic aberration that milk became a food staple in northern Europe and North America,” observed Discover magazine in a 2000 examination of milk and nutrition. “Nature normally programs the young for weaning before they reach adulthood by turning down production in early childhood of the enzyme that breaks down lactose. But a gene mutation inherited by people of northern European descent prevents the production of this enzyme from being turned down.”2

Today, the majority of adults throughout the world, especially in Asia and Africa, still can’t absorb the main sugar in cow’s milk—lactose— without experiencing sometimes severe physical symptoms.
We humans weren’t meant to be dairy consumers. We weren’t designed to consume milk from any species other than our own. The reason is because nature offers up different mother’s milk formulas for different species based on their unique nutritional needs.

“It’s unnatural to drink milk and what’s good for baby calves isn’t necessarily good for human babies or adults,” is how nutritional biochemist T. Colin Campbell has put it.3 By the time most humans reach 10 years of age, they can’t consume milk without cramping, bloating, constipation or diarrhea.
Perhaps the first human nutritional expert to point out that milk isn’t essential to the human diet was the Biochemist and Professor E.V. McCollum of Johns Hopkins University, in the early 20th century. He described how people in southern Asia, with no history of drinking milk, have remarkable physiques and endurance, along with strong bones and “the finest teeth of any people in the world,” which is in sharp contrast to lesser physiques found among dairy consuming cultures. Ironically and rather sadly, this information unfavorable to dairy was deleted in the later editions of his book The Newer Knowledge of Nutrition, after Professor McCollum became a well paid consultant to the National Dairy Products Company.4

There is anecdotal evidence that during World War I, when cow’s milk was in short supply throughout much of Europe, infant death rates dropped because mothers had to breast-feed more often. Subsequent research on infant mortality and the use of cow’s milk have added weight to that observation.

In a study involving 9,886 newborn babies in the Philippines, researchers found that when nursery policies changed from a reliance on cow’s milk formula to breastfeeding, the incidence of oral thrush, diarrhea, and clinical sepsis and death “were drastically reduced during the intensification of the breastfeeding program,” according to the Journal of Tropical Pediatrics.5 Similar findings came from Brazil where a team of researchers studying infant mortality discovered that breast-fed infants had 14 times less risk of death from diarrhea and 3 times less risk of death from respiratory infections than infants given cow’s milk or formula made with cow’s milk.6

Somewhat more controversial has been evidence that cow’s milk and baby formula raise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Such findings initially came from New Zealand in the form of a three-year study that followed nearly 2,000 infants and their feeding habits. Breastfed infants had “a significantly lower risk of SIDS than infants not breastfed,” concluded the International Journal of Epidemiology report.7 What has become clear is that cultures without a history of dairy consumption are healthier in many important respects than cultures which have embraced high levels of dairy consumption. Breast cancer rates are one example. Among rural Chinese women, aged 35 to 64, a major nutritional study found that breast cancer only averaged 8.7 cases per 100,000 women, compared to 44 cases and above per 100,000 women in the U.S. and much of Europe. Much lower dairy consumption, milk in particular, among the Chinese women seemed to account for the cancer differences.8

Consider the rates of osteoporosis in dairy reliant versus non-dairy reliant cultures. During the 1980s the China-Oxford-Cornell project on diet and disease, directed by Cornell University Professor Campbell, used data gathered from 6,500 Chinese families to find that among women over 50 years of age, their hip fracture rate was five times lower than what the U.S. and other Western cultures endure. Chinese women with their milk-free diet were getting their calcium from vegetables and fruits, whereas Western women absorbed most of their calcium from dairy products. Apparently, chemistry inherent to dairy leaches calcium from bone, making the Western women alarmingly more susceptible to weakened bones and fractures.9

The health pattern of non-dairy cultures being healthier than dairy cultures holds up when we look at prostate cancer and other diseases. In the case of prostate cancer, research has revealed the incidence rates to be 10 times higher in dairy-glutted Western Europe than in Asia, though those rates in Asian countries gradually began to get higher as Western dietary habits centered on dairy consumption were popularized and began to spread along with fast food.10

Diabetes rates provide another example in point. There is study evidence that in Finland, where cow’s milk in particular, and dairy consumption in general, is historically high, type 1 diabetes is 36 times higher than in Japan, where dairy has historically never been a dietary staple.11 This glaring difference should give any cow’s milk drinker pause for considerable reflection and concern.

Within dairy consuming cultures the health pattern also appears when comparing those who consume dairy and animal products to those who do not consume them. In a 2010 study of 85,168 U.S. women (aged 34 to 59 years) and 44,548 men (aged 40 to 75 years) without any diagnosed heart disease, cancer, or diabetes, an extraordinary 26 years of follow-up assessment by researchers occurred for the women and 20 years of follow-up for the men. Low-carbohydrate diets, either animal-based (emphasizing animal sources of fat and protein, including dairy) or vegetable-based (emphasizing vegetable sources of fat and protein) were computed from several food-frequency questionnaires. The study concluded: “The animal low-carbohydrate diet based on animal sources was associated with a higher all-cause mortality in both men and women, whereas a vegetable-based low-carbohydrate diet was associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality rates.”12

A huge European study with results released in 2013 came up with similar findings. Using data from 23,531 study participants, associations were analyzed between consuming 45 different foods and the risk for a variety of major chronic diseases, namely, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The scientists concluded: “Higher intakes of low-fat dairy, butter, red meat and sauce were associated with higher risks of chronic diseases.”13

The evidence for a link between dairy consumption and your risk of stroke has been mixed and inconclusive, with some study results indicating a possible risk and many others failing to find a connection. The key to an answer might be found in the synergistic interactions between certain ‘nutrients’ in dairy and other foods combined with lifestyle habits which compound health problems.

To illustrate what I mean, a 2009 study in Finland examined the association between dairy food intake and risk of stroke using 26,556 Finnish male smokers aged 50–69 years who had no history of stroke. They completed a food frequency questionnaire. With the study researchers came to this conclusion: “We observed positive associations between whole milk intake and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage, and between yogurt intake and subarachnoid hemorrhage. These findings suggest that intake of certain dairy foods may be associated with risk of stroke.”14

What you will see in the large accumulation of medical science studies is a clear, persuasive, and growing body of research linking dairy products with the upsurge in chronic diseases being inflicted on humankind. It all starts with the cocktail of chemicals found naturally in milk.

REFERENCES
1 “Historical Timeline: A brief history of cow’s milk.” ProCon.org. http://milk.procon.org/viiew.resource.php?resourceID=000832.
2 Dan Winters, Gary Tanhauser, Will Hively. “Worrying About Milk.” Discover. August 2000.
3 Ibid.
4 Shelton, Herbert M. The Hygienic System, pg. 172 (Dr. Shelton’s Health School: 1947.)
5 Clavano NR. “Mode of Feeding and its Effect on Infant Mortality and Morbidity.” J Trop Ped. 1982;28(6):287–293.
6 Victora CG. Et al. “Evidence for protection by breast-feeding against infant deaths from infectious diseases in Brazil.” Lancet. 1987 Aug 8;2(8554):319–22.
7 Ford, RPK. Et al. Int J Epidemology. 1993;22(5):885–890.
8 Ibid. Dan Winters.
9 Campbell, T. Colin. The China Study. 2006 (BenBella: Dallas).
10 Ibid. Winters.
11 LaPorte RE. Et al. “Geographic differences in the risk of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: the importance of registries.” Diabetes Care. 1985; 8(Suppl. 1)101–107.
12 Fung TT. Et al. “Low-Carbohydrate Diets and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.” Annals of Internal Medicine. Sep 7, 2010:153(5):289–298.
13 Von Ruesten A. Et al. “Diet and risk of chronic diseases: results from the first 8 years of follow-up in the EPIC-Potsdam study.” Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Feb 6 (Epub ahead of print.)
14 Larsson SC. Et al. “Dairy foods and risk of stroke.” Epidemiology. 2009 May;20(3):355–60.

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The Value of Organic Foods by David Wolfe

The Value of Organic Foods by David Wolfe

The value of organic raw foods, superfoods, and herbs is critically
important for a safe, healthy, and happy future for all of us, our children,
and our children’s children. The evidence is increasingly pointing towards
an organic future.

Organics foods are known to have the following characteristics:

Organic food is richer in minerals:

Organic farmers, in general, are more interested than conventional farmers
in growing mineral-rich produce. The famous Rutgers study demonstrated that
organic food was superior in the following minerals: phosphorus, calcium,
magnesium, potassium, sodium, boron, manganese, iron, copper, and cobalt. It
all starts with mineral-rich soil. When more minerals are available to the
plant, the plant’s vitamin, polysaccharide, and enzyme content, as well as
overall immune system are improved. When we eat mineral-rich food we absorb
the nutrients that made the plant healthy. We also enjoy more conscious
choices and freedom as the cells throughout our body become healthier and
more vital. Entire books have been written on how rich soils help build
enormous civilizations and how subsequent mismanagement of crops and the
soil leads to a loss of soil minerals and the subsequent collapse of these
civilizations.

Organic agriculture is sustainable:

Organic food production has existed for thousands of years. It will continue
as long as humans walk the planet. Organic agriculture is non-toxic (it
leaves no permanent toxicity). The pesticide and artificial fertilizer
industries are toxic and not sustainable. These industries have covered the
entire planet with dangerous chemicals. The story of DDT is known to nearly
all of us. DDT went into commercial distribution in 1948. Because of its
unsustainable toxicity, DDT was banned in the United States in 1972 and soon
after was banned worldwide. DDT is a known neurotoxin and carcinogen. Who
was brought to justice after the facts about DDT were revealed? How many
people, children, and animals were (are) injured by this chemical? How much
longer is it possible to continue to spray the Earth with poisons?

Organic agricultural supports being chemical-free:

With the explosion of cancer and disease in Western culture, who has the
authority to say that any artificial chemicals are safe on our food?

Consider the summary from the following 2003 research article in which
pesticide exposure was at least six times higher in the diets of children
eating conventional food (as compared to organic food):

“We assessed organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure from diet by
biological monitoring among Seattle, Washington, preschool children. Parents
kept food diaries for 3 days before urine collection, and they distinguished
organic and conventional foods based on label information. Children were
then classified as having consumed either organic or conventional diets
based on analysis of the diary data. Residential pesticide use was also
recorded for each home. We collected 24-hr urine samples from 18 children
with organic diets and 21 children with conventional diets and analyzed them
for five OP pesticide metabolites. We found significantly higher median
concentrations of total dimethyl alkylphosphate metabolites than total
diethyl alkylphosphate metabolites (0.06 and 0.02 µmol/L, respectively ; p =
0.0001) . The median total dimethyl metabolite concentration was
approximately six times higher for children with conventional diets than for
children with organic diets (0.17 and 0.03 µmol/L ; p = 0.0003) ; mean
concentrations differed by a factor of nine (0.34 and 0.04 µmol/L) . We
calculated dose estimates from urinary dimethyl metabolites and from
agricultural pesticide use data, assuming that all exposure came from a
single pesticide. The dose estimates suggest that consumption of organic
fruits, vegetables, and juice can reduce children’s exposure levels from
above to below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s current
guidelines, thereby shifting exposures from a range of uncertain risk to a
range of negligible risk. Consumption of organic produce appears to provide
a relatively simple way for parents to reduce their children’s exposure to
OP pesticides.”

Taken from “Organophosphorus Pesticide Exposure of Urban and Suburban
Preschool Children with Organic and Conventional Diets” by Cynthia L. Curl,
CL, RA Fenske and K Elgethun, 2003. (www.ehponline.org/docs/2003/5754/abstract.html)

Organic food is safer on our hormone system:

The endocrine or hormone system may be more susceptible to toxicity than the
nervous system. A growing body of research is indicating that an
inappropriate exposure to certain pesticides during the developmental cycle
of growth in humans and animals can cause serious long-lasting endocrine and
hormone disorders.

The Environmental Working Group recently published the following statements
(www.foodnews.org/reduce.php): “Many pesticides are now considered
‘endocrine disrupters,’ in part because the term is something of a catch
phrase for chemicals that cause a variety of changes in normal hormone
signaling. Some better known examples of highly toxic endocrine disrupting
pesticides are DDT (and its metabolite DDE) which are now known to exhibit
much of their toxicity through anti-androgenic (de-masculinizing)
properties, vinclozolin, a heavily used fungicide that is also
anti-androgenic, endosulfan, a DDT relative with estrogenic properties that
is found more often in food than any other pesticide, and atrazine, a weed
killer with broad hormonal activity, that contaminates the drinking water of
about 20 million people in the United States.

Eating organic foods, superfoods, and herbs is safe, easy, and fun!

You can grow organic foods anywhere with seeds, nice soil, sunshine,
sufficient moisture, smiles, and lots of love. Gardening skills are
attractive and make for a safe, healthy hobby. Organic foods have
been proven over thousands of years to be safe to eat.

Conventional foods have been proven over 50 years to be unsafe to eat. I saw
a conventional lettuce farmer near Santa Barbara, California climb out of
his tractor in a space suit on in order to protect himself from the
chemicals he was spraying. Does this sound like progress or a bad horror
movie?

Remember, you vote with your dollar. Cutting corners cheats everyone. Let’s
vote for organic farmers.

TIP OF THE WEEK:
SHOPPER’S GUIDE – BUY ORGANIC & AVOID THE “DIRTY DOZEN” FRUITS & VEGETABLES
According to the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) analysis of data from over 43,000 tests on pesticides in conventional produce, over 90% of ingestion of pesticides in foods can be eliminated by avoiding the most contaminated foods. The “Dirty Dozen” most contaminated foods are peaches (97 percent tested positive for residue), apples (92 percent tested positive), sweet bell peppers, celery, nectarines, strawberries, cherries, pears, imported grapes, spinach, lettuce and potatoes. The “Consistently Clean” are onions (90 percent tested negative), avocados (90 percent), sweet corn (90 percent), pineapples, mango, asparagus, sweet peas, kiwi, bananas, cabbage, broccoli and papaya. “Federal produce tests tell us that some fruits and vegetables are so likely to be contaminated with pesticides that you should always buy them organic. Others are so consistently clean that you can eat them with less concern.” Says EWG Senior Vice President Richard Wiles. Download your wallet-sized shopper’s guide here: http://www.foodnews.org

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Company Review: Foods Alive – Organic Raw Living Food Products Part 2

Foods Alive – Life Giving and Mineral-Rich Artisan Crafted Organic Raw Living Foods Part 2 In business since 2002

I am choosing to quote info from the company and their website, as they explain about the products very well and I wanted to make sure I give them credit for it. I am simply giving my reviews of the products based on tasting and using them to create delicious recipes which you can watch me make on my YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheRawsomeVeganGal

From Foods Alive website: http://www.foodsalive.com/?Click=827
We source the highest quality and best tasting super foods from across the globe to bring you and your family the most mineral rich and nutrient dense foods available. Super Foods are a great source of Anti-oxidants, Amino Acids (proteins), Dietary Fiber and many other hard to find essential vitamins and minerals that are necessary for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Hemp Products
Toasted Hemp Seeds

From Foods Alive website: Did you know that Thomas Jefferson wrote a draft of the United States Declaration of Independence on hemp paper?! Our toasted whole hemp seeds are lightly seasoned with sea salt to make a delicious, nutritious snack or food ingredient. To read more: http://www.foodsalive.com/Toasted-Hemp-Seeds-w-salt-Organic-14-oz-p/0036.htm?Click=827

My review: I am not a fan of using salt, as a rule, as you may have read a previous post I had on this topic, regardless, this product is not very salty. It has a nice crunchy taste. They are “whole” hemp seeds, as opposed to the raw “hulled” seeds (the shells are removed) that this company also sells. They are really yummy and it is hard to stop eating them. If you like salty snacks, order more then one bag, especially if you a family. This is a great healthy savory snack to eat right out of the bag or add to salads, trail mix, soups, etc.

Hemp Protein Powder

From Foods Alive site: Hemp seeds are one of nature’s best sources for plant-based protein. Containing all of the essential amino acids the body needs, our hemp protein powder is a perfect boost to your morning. Try adding hemp protein powder to your smoothies, shakes and yogurt, or use hemp protein to replace up to 25% of the flour in a baked good. To read more: http://www.foodsalive.com/Hemp-Protein-Powder-Organic-50-protein-8-oz-p/0035.htm?Click=827

My review: The hemp protein powder is made from milling and sifting the hemp seed cake, which is a by-product of pressing hemp seeds into hemp oil. Hemp is a great source for plant-based protein and is also low in fat and high in EFA’s. You can make shakes and smoothies with it and use for baking. I experimented with it to make savory protein-rich truffles and also a cheesy spread to put on crackers, tortillas or vegetables (I will have a video up soon on my YouTube channel with recipes).

Chia Protein Powder

From Foods Alive site: Chia Protein is crafted by carefully separating the oils from the seeds. This creates a wonderful high protein and high fiber product that can be added to a variety of different foods. Chia Protein is a very nutritious addition to protein shakes, smoothies, cereals, porridge, yogurts and more. It can also be used as a partial substitute for flour. Chia Protein is loaded with an abundance of nutients such as calcium, protein, anti-oxidants and dietary fiber and also contains all the essential Amino Acids to provide a nutritional punch! To read more: http://www.foodsalive.com/Chia-Protein-Powder-Organic-8-oz-p/0043.htm?Click=827

My review: Chia is a power-packed superfood. The powder can be used as a thickener for baking – egg replacer. You can also sprinkle it on food – salad, grains, casseroles, etc for a protein and mineral boost to your meal. I also use it to make dressings, sauces and gravies. It is low in fat and can help the body retain electrolytes because of its ability to absorb up to 12 times it weight in water.

Black Sesame Protein Powder

From Foods Alive site: Black Sesame Protein is loaded with an abundance of nutrients such as calcium, protein, anti-oxidants and dietary fiber- making it a nutritional powerhouse! Black Sesame Protein is crafted by carefully separating the oils from the seeds. This creates a wonderful high protein and high fiber product that can be added to a variety of different foods. Black Sesame Protein is a very nutritious addition to protein shakes, smoothies, cereals, porridge, yogurts and more. It can also be used as a partial substitute for flour. For more info: http://www.foodsalive.com/Black-Sesame-Protein-Powder-Organic-8-oz-p/0059.htm?Click=827

My review: I really like the “gritty/fluffy” nature of this product. I use it to make truffles and in a creamy sweet or savory sauce/dressing/spread. In baking it is great to add some texture. It is high in protein, low in fat and has healing properties for the kidney and liver meridians. This and all the other powders are great for shakes, smoothies, baking, etc.

Nutritional Yeast

From Foods Alive site: Nutritional yeast is an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, vitamins (especially the B-complex vitamins including B12), and minerals. Yellow in color and with a nutty cheesy flavor, nutritional yeast is an inactive yeast that is a favorite amongst many vegans because of its unique flavor and similarity to cheese when added to foods. To read more: http://www.foodsalive.com/Nutritional-Yeast-6-oz-p/0047.htm?Click=827

My review: Some vegans may be “on the fence” about using this product, as it is made by culturing the yeast with sugarcane and beet molasses. The other side of it, is the fact that it is a great source of B-complex vitamins, including B12 and is a complete protein, as well. I have gone back and forth myself with using and not using this product. I prefer to buy a product from a company that I know is sourced to be non-GMO. Many health food stores sell it in their bulk bins and I have bought it there, in the past, but I am not so sure of the quality. I like to sprinkle it on my salads, grains and also use to make a “cheesy” spread/sauce/dressing (I will have an upcoming video with recipes using all the products).

This company offers so many great raw organic super foods to nourish and help you to achieve vibrant health. If you have not tried any as yet, now you have more information to do so. You can check out their website: http://www.foodsalive.com/?Click=827 to purchase direct or find which stores carry their products.

Disclaimer: I was not sponsored to write this, but I did receive a sample of the product(s). These are strictly my opinions. I only review products that I, myself would use and purchase.

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