Gut Health – from Yuri Elkaim and Hippocrates Health Institute

Foods to repopulate good bacteria in the gut from Yuri Elkaim
http://www.totalwellnessconsulting.ca

Is your gut infested with dangerous belly bugs?
Chances are that it is, especially considering the overuse of friendly bacteria-killing agents like chlorinated water, antibiotics, and high sugar foods.

These are all triggers that kill off good bacteria and provide a breeding ground for bad bacteria… ultimately leading to a condition called “dysbiosis” (or an imbalance of good to bad bacteria in your gut).

Why is this a problem?
First of all, 80% of your immune system resides around your gut and communicates directly with the bacteria within it.
Hundreds of studies have shown that dysbiosis creates a host of immune disorders and makes you more susceptible to frequent colds and infections, and even worse.

Second, bad bacteria are known to give off a deadly toxin called lipopolysaccharides (LPS). An unhealthy gut becomes a factory for LPS, which can then seap back into your blood stream and cause major damage throughout your body.

For example, LPS have been shown to:
* disrupt thyroid hormone activity, leading to low thyroid symptoms (no wonder, it’s hard to lose weight).
* create NEW fat cells (yes, new ones!). So unless you enjoy storing more fat, this is not good at all.
* increase your risk of insulin resistance (can you say “hello diabetes”?)

And more!
Needless to say, the health of your gut is paramount to your overall health.
Thankfully, I’ve come to your rescue again by hooking you up with 3 foods that repopulate more good bacteria into your gut and fight off those nasty, toxin-producing bad bacteria.

#1 – Kefir

Kefir means “feel good” in Turkish. Kefir is a probiotic beverage made with either kefir grains or a powdered kefir starter culture. Kefir grains eat the sugar in a food, leaving behind a more nutritious probiotic-rich beverage because of the lactic acid and beneficial bacteria it adds.

#2 – Kombucha

Kombucha is an all-natural health beverage, made from fermented tea and a starter culture called a SCOBY. It’s chockfull of probiotics and other healthy amino acids. Brewing kombucha at home is a simple and rewarding process. If you can make a cup of tea, you can make kombucha.

#3 – Sauerkraut

Cultured veggies (like cabbage) are the ultimate enzyme-rich food and they’re loaded with natural probiotics as they undergo fermentation.

They are already predigested before you even eat them, which makes their digestion so much easier. The fermentation also enhances the nutrients found within by making them much more available to us. Sauerkraut goes amazingly well in salads.

The Power of Probiotics – from Hippocrates Health Institute http://hippocratesinst.org

Probiotics are beneficial bacteria and microorganisms that live in your gut. This includes things like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactic acid bacteria, Bifidobacteria, Bifidobacterium longum, and Escherichia coli to name just a few. Probiotics aid in digestion, help you synthesize and absorb nutrients from your food, and boost your immune system. When the digestive tract is healthy, these beneficial bacteria filter out and eliminate things that can damage it, such as harmful bacteria, toxins, chemicals, and other waste products. On the flip side, it takes in the things that our body needs (nutrients from food and water) and absorbs and helps deliver them to the cells where they are needed.

Probiotics also serve many other important functions such as:

Helping lower cholesterol
Helping lower blood pressure
Helps with allergies
Reducing inflammation
Managing urogenital health
Support the development and functioning of the gut

The majority of probiotics colonize in the large intestine. These living organisms form a neural network that is sometimes called your “second brain.” This neural network in your gut takes in information from your external environment and remains in constant communication with your first brain through your central nervous system helping it make decisions. Hence the term, “gut feeling.”

Probiotics maintain a balance in your gut between beneficial bacteria and pathogenic bacteria. Drinking chlorinated water and the use of antibiotics destroys all living organisms in your gut including beneficial bacteria. Stress can also contribute to an overgrowth of harmful bacterial. During a delivery through the birth canal, a newborn picks up bacteria from his/her mother. These good bacteria are not transmitted when a Cesarean section is performed and have been shown to be the reason why some infants born by Cesarean section have allergies, less than optimal immune systems, and lower levels of gut microflora.

A lack of sufficient amounts of beneficial bacteria weakens your immune system and leaves you open and exposed to germs, bad bacteria, and virus that can make you sick. Raw sauerkraut and Kim Chee is an excellent way to repopulate you gut with probiotics. The supplemental use of LiveGive “Instinct” is another powerful way to restore a balance of your intestinal microflora.

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